Model Page

Anops kingii ( Keel-headed Worm Lizard )
Amphisbaenia, Reptile, Squamata

This model of the cranium of Anops kingii is part of a collaborative project with Dr. Anthony Herrel (C.R.N.S.) and Dr. Nate Kley (SUNY Stony Brook). The goal of this project is to compare stress in the skulls of amphisbaenids that have very different skull shapes and use different digging techniques.

Archaeolemur sp. cf. edwarsi ( Fossil lemur )
Mammal, Primates

The goal of this project was to test the hypotheses that  Archaeolemur sp. cf. edwarsdi may have processed large, hard objects (such as nuts) that would have required wide gapes and large bite force for cracking, while Hadropithecus stenognathus used its molars to grind small but gritty objects (such as the corms of grasses).

Artibeus jamaicensis ( Jamaican fruit bat )

This analysis of the skull in a Jamacian fruit bat is part of an on-going collaboration between Drs. Dumont and Grosse that investigates the link between feeding behavior and the evolution of skull form.

Callithrix jacchus penicillata ( Common Marmoset )

This analysis of incisor biting in a Common Marmoset is part of an on-going collaboration with Drs. Jul Davis and Ian Grosse (UMass Amherst) and Dr. Anne Burrows (Duquesne University).

Canis mesomelas ( Black-backed Jackal )

This project investigated the relationship between cranial form and function in the trophically diverse dog family, Canidae, using linear morphometrics and finite element (FE) analyses that simulated the internal and external forces that act on the skull during the act of prey capture and killing.

Canis simensis ( Ethiopian Wolf )

This project investigated the relationship between cranial form and function in the trophically diverse dog family, Canidae, using linear morphometrics and finite element (FE) analyses that simulated the internal and external forces that act on the skull during the act of prey capture and killing.

Carollia perspicillata ( Seba’s Short-tailed Bat )

This analysis of the skull in a Seba’s Short-tailed Bat is part of an on-going collaboration between Drs. Dumont and Grosse that investigates the link between feeding behavior and the evolution of skull form.

Crocuta crocuta ( Spotted Hyena )

One unusual skull feature, present in bone-cracking members of the family Hyaenidae, is a caudally elongated frontal sinus, hypothesized to function in resistance to bending and stress dissipation during bone-cracking. In the present study, we used finite element (FE) analysis to examine patterns of stress distribution in the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) skull during unilateral biting, and inquire about the functional role of the fronto-parietal sinus in stress dissipation.

Dinocrocuta gigantea ( Giant percrocutid carnivoran )
Euoplocephalus tutus ( Ankylosaur )
Reptile

This model was one of four ankylosaur tail clubs modeled for an MSc thesis at the University of Alberta. It has long been assumed that ankylosaurids used their tails as weapons for defense against attacks from large meat-eating theropods like Albertosaurus, Tyrannosaurus, and Tarbosaurus. Impact forces for a variety of tail club sizes were estimated and used to examine how the tail club would react during impacts. If the stresses in the models after the simulations were run exceeded that which were required to fracture bone, then it would be unlikely that ankylosaurs used their tails in a defensive manner.